Reusable Cotton Wool Pads

I actually had planned to abandon store-bought, single-use cotton pads for a while, but I just could not find the motivation to finally start making my own washable ones from cotton leftovers. However, sorting my stash recently made me aware of the huge amount of cotton leftovers waiting to be made into something. You can find quite a few (free) patterns for this crocheted version on Ravelry which are actually pretty similar. I chose one from 2013, DIY: Reusable Cotton Wool Pads by Lyndsey Haskell. The pattern is easy to follow and the pads are fast and fun to make. My first bunch comprises 15 ones which used up 58g of DK weight cotton yarn in sum. I have not tested them yet as I need about 50 of them to start the using/washing cycle in a relaxed way. So, there will be more of them, soon.

Advertisements

My Finished Botani-KAL

[sponsored: free yarn sample]

This went a lot quicker than expected! Although the plain stockinette part of the Wrapped in Leaves shawl bored me a lot, the leafy edging was really fun to knit.

The pattern is well-written and used 143g of Austermann Alpaca Star, which I was offered for free by the yarn manufacturer. The yarn, in my opinion, suits the pattern perfectly. Its halo gives the shawl a super comfy feel while the tiny sequins add some elegance at the same time. I have heard other testers complain about the size of the sequins as they only measure about 2mm in diameter, but I particularly like this size. It makes the shawl sparkle only when light hits the sequins directly, so they catch your eye only at second glance.

The yarn is available from July 2018 and is ultra versatile for any fall and winter knits. Just imagine a fluffy, oversized sweater sparkling in the spotlight only. It knits up quite fast with a recommended needle size of 4-5 mm and a meterage of 150 m per 50g. The fibre content is 36% baby alpaca, 35% nylon, 15% silk and 14% cotton, so it is lightweight, yet warm. Although I usually complain about any synthetic fibre, it did not bother me this time. Good job, Austermann!

The Black Metal Hoodie

[advertisement: unpaid links]

When I stumbled upon Pascuali‘s Nepal yarn last year, I knew I had to find an extraordinary project for it. I wanted something lightweight to wear directly on my skin, which would also showcase the yarn’s beautiful drape and texture. Sadly, I could not find a suitable pattern, so I designed my own. The idea was to knit an airy, sleeveless summer top to wear on goth and metal festivals. Combining some classic styles, the black metal hoodie was born. With its oversized hood, extra large armholes and a racerback, it is my perfect garment for this summer.

The yarn composition is 60% cotton, 28% linen and 12% nettle with a meterage of 180m per 50g. It is a soft, fingering weight yarn that knits up easily. I definitely recommend you to try it out, it feels very comfortable on the skin. It is perfect for summer garments and accessories.

The hoodie weighs only 321g, more than half of the weight is used in the hood. I’m really looking forward for this year’s festival season!

Finally, a sweater for myself

[advertisement: unpaid links]

This is not my first sweater, by far. But it is the first sweater I love and wear from the start. It is made of beautiful Lana Grossa Evento, a discontinued cotton and merino blend in DK weight. The raglan pattern is from Phildar and actually was intended to have a woven back. I tried, but my yarn was way too soft and weaving knitted strips across the back did not hold its shape at all.

After a year or so of hibernating, I still wanted to wear the sweater, but it still lacked the back part. I somehow stumbled upon this Russian lace pattern and found it quite appropriate. The only tricky part was to fit a lace back into a complete but backless sweater. Well, obviously, I succeeded. And here’s a picture of the result:

Holey Purple

[advertisement: unpaid links]

This sweater has quite a history. When I first stumbled over the Coldwave Sweater pattern on Ravelry back in 2014, I wanted to make one instantly. Sadly, I did not know how to crochet that time, so I postponed the project and decided to learn how to crochet first.

I have to admit, that until I actually started crocheting my Coldwave Sweater this March, I did not find any crochet pattern I wanted to use as practice. This was a very bad idea. The pattern is rather complicated and poorly explained at once. Nonetheless, I succeeded thanks to a lot of help from another Raveler. I am sure I would have despaired of it otherwise. This was learning how to crochet the hard way.

However, I have finished it and I love it! My first intention was to wear it at this year’s WGT or at least the Amphi Festival indeed, but I had too many problems understanding the pattern. Did I mention already that I love that sweater? Although it is not black? Well, I will always wear black underneath, so this actually is no point. The big holes make it a great finger trap when you (try to) put it on, by the way.

I have used a really cheap DK weight cotton yarn I found deep down in my stash. My finished sweater, crocheted in the smallest size, weighs 342g . As this pattern has only 15 projects since 2014, of which only 6 are finished, be adventurous and crochet it! Once you get the hang of it, it will turn out a quick project. In case you succeed, you will get a wonderful layering piece you can wear both to goth events and in public.